Episode 144. Testosterone Replacement Therapy for Men

Episode 144. Testosterone Replacement Therapy for Men

★★★★★
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Show Notes

Scott discusses the benefits of therapeutic testosterone replacement therapy, its effects, the symptoms it treats, and how it widely differs from stacked steroid usage.

Coach Scott has lectured at Michigan State University on performance enhancing drugs and was referenced by the Canadian Government as an expert on the subject. He recently wrote a blog posted in T Nation documenting on why he quit steroids. Accessible also through his website: scottabelfitness.com/quitsteroids

 

“There’s little point to adding years to your life if you can’t just as equally add life to your years.”

  • Testosterone Replacement Therapy (TRT, aka Hormone Replacement Therapy) is completely different than steroid use found in bodybuilding.
  • TRT [when prescribed and monitored by a physician] is safe and effective.
  • Testosterone is involved in many biological functions beyond sex drive; it affects mood, thinking, cognition, muscle and fat distribution, bone strength, and sense of well-being.
  • Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) can help men and post-menopausal women.
  • Testosterone production declines with age. That doesn’t mean it should be accepted and lived with if there are scientifically proven ways to treat it. Not doing so would be like not wearing eyeglasses [or contacts] to improve vision.
  • Symptoms of low testosterone: low libido, lack of enthusiasm, low energy and overall vitality.
  • A blood test can determine if you have low testosterone. Low T is often misdiagnosed as low thyroid.
  • Testosterone in the low normal range can produce symptoms. Some labs only label testosterone as low if it’s in the very low range. Borderline low T is often left untreated when TRT would help relieve symptoms.
  • The increased vitality resulting from TRT can improve adherence to training and diet strategy.
  • The positive effects of TRT may take a few weeks to exhibit themselves.

[References]

Morgentaler,A, “The Truth about Men and Sex.St. Martin’s Press, 2015.

Morgentaler A, Testosterone for Life. McGraw Hill, 2009.

Morgentaler A, Bruning CO, DeWolf WC. “Incidence of Occult Prostate Cancer with Low Serum Testosterone Levels.” Journal of the American Medical Association, 996 Dec 18;276(23):1904-6.

Morgentaler, A, “Testosterone replacement therapy and prostate risks: where’s the Beef?” Canadian Journal of Urology, 2006 Feb;13 Suppl 1:40-3.

 

Training Resources by Scott

Physique After 50
The Aging Proposition

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Episode 143. Rattling Another Protein Myth

Episode 143. Rattling Another Protein Myth

★★★★★
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Show Notes

Think protein is the macronutrient that satisfies best? Think again. Scott shares peer-reviewed scientific research that says differently.

 

Recent science refutes paleo dogma

  • Short chain fatty acids (SCFA) produced by the gut provide a number of positive effects on health, notably reduction in Type II diabetes, obesity and heart disease.
  • SCFA influence hunger, size of appetite and cravings.
  • Acetate, propionate and butyrate are the short chain fatty acids produced in the gut.
  • High-fiber foods are linked to an increase in SCFA.
    Fruits and vegetables contain fiber. Animal proteins don’t.

“Evidence suggests that for most of history [humans] consumed more indigestible plant material, such as grasses, sedges and tubers, than is present in a typical western-style diet (>100 g per day dietary fibre compared with <15 g per day in the average modern-day diet)…” – International Journal of Obesity

  • This study contradicts paleo dogma.
    The more fiber you eat, the less you eat overall.
  • Evidence suggests that colonic propionate production helps reduce the amounts we eat and may curb reward-based eating.
  • Data from a 2015 study published in Gut show that increasing [the amount of] colonic propionate prevents [further] weight gain in overweight adults.
  • High fiber diets help automatically protect against over-eating.
  • Science disagrees with gym-floor folklore about which foods satiate best.

[References]

Byrne CS, et al. “The role of short chain fatty acids in appetite regulation and energy homeostasis.” International Journal of Obesity. 2015 Sep; 39(9): 1331–1338.

 

Byrne CS, et al. “Increased colonic propionate reduces anticipatory reward responses in the human striatum to high-energy food.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2016 Jul; 104(1): 5–14.

 

Chambers ES, et al.  “Effects of targeted delivery of propionate to the human colon on appetite regulation, body weight maintenance and adiposity in overweight adults.” Gut. 2015 Nov;64(11):1744-54.

 

Lin HV, et al. “Butyrate and propionate protect against diet-induced obesity and regulate gut hormones via free fatty acid receptor 3-independent mechanisms.” Public Library of Science PLosOne. 2012;7(4):e35240.

 

Diet Resources by Scott

Lean Without Trying

The Cycle Diet

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Special Episode. Remembering Andy Sinclair

Special Episode. Remembering Andy Sinclair

★★★★★
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Show Notes

In this special episode, Scott pays tribute to the memory of his friend and protege, cover model Andy Sinclair.

 

In Loving Memory…

 

  • Fitness and physique model Andy Sinclair passed away suddenly two weeks ago. (Andy was the model for Smarter Sculpted Physique.)
  • There was a lot more to Andy than fitness. He was a “three-dimensional” guy.
  • Andy had a spiritual side he didn’t talk about much.
  • He did good deeds in private. Scott learned after Andy’s passing that he’d been monetarily sponsoring a boy in Africa. A neighbor just happened to notice Andy cleaning up other people’s litter along a nature trail near his condo.
  • As a schoolboy, Andy would often give his lunch to another student [who had none]. He won his school citizenship award several years in a row.
  • People from all ages—people Scott had never met—attended Andy’s memorial service. He was friendly to everyone.
  • Andy had a connection to nature. His nature photography was accepted within 24 hours by an online nature stock photo site that receives 300 applications a day.
  • He became more and more uncomfortable with the physical stuff. His social media posts of his own body were to encourage others to get fit for themselves and to engage in fitness in a healthy way, rather than to call attention to himself.
  • He had little interest in the concept of “more.”
  • What would Andy’s parting words be? Scott thinks he would say to be kind to your neighbors and be kind to yourself.

“Lone wolf, not lonely wolf.” – Andy Sinclair

 

In lieu of other remembrances, Andy’s family requests that donations be made to The Humane Society of Canada or The Salvation Army.

Episode 142. Live Q&A with JC Santana

Episode 142. Live Q&A with JC Santana

★★★★★
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Show Notes

Scott and JC host a Live Q&A session, fielding audience questions about exercise methods, biomechanics, the pros and cons of combining training methods, and the importance of recovery.

 

If you’re not taking care of your body, your body can’t take care of you.

Some opening questions from the audience:
    • Safety bar squats? They’re great for people with shoulder issues.
    • Trap bar squats?They have similar kinetic chain expression as the dumbbell squats but with different balance demands.
    • Ball slams? More of a power generator than a core exercise.
  • Why is not training to failure better? The right amount of fatigue is the question. There’s technical failure and “fatigue” [volitional] failure. Olympic lifters have shown that they get better when they don’t train to failure.
  • Recovery requires energy:
    • Training to complete failure saps the body of energy needed to recover.
    • Training to complete failure taps into the immune system.
    • Training hard and training smart can co-exist.

Volume, frequency and intensity dictate how often to train.

  • Some muscles were meant to work more, like calves, because they’re locomotive and used all the time. You could probably train calves every day, but not chest, because it’s not locomotive.
  • Jiu-Jitsu is for “gumby people.” It requires tremendous flexibility that few have.
  • Bodybuilding combined with MMA training can lead to joint issues. The training styles are incompatible.
  • JC prefers the leg press over squats for hypertrophy, especially for the hardgainer.
  • Resistance training tips for women:
    • Functional training is great for women who want to get toned without getting big because those exercises (like stability ball bridges) distribute load over many muscles.
    • Strength training—low reps greater weight—work well for women who want to work on bone density. The reps stay low enough not to encourage too much hypertrophy.

No one can out-train a bad diet. A great physique is diet-mediated.

  • The only two places to rest a barbell for squat are the traps for back squats or the clavicular shelf for front squats. The more vertical orientation of the front squat places additional demands on knees and hips.
  • External rotation of the hip is required to squat deep. They also place rotational demands on the knees.
  • Three carries for the dumbbell squats: overhead, shoulder, and hang.
  • The hang carry for dumbbells creates form problems when using heavy weight, which is why JC prefers trap bar squat to dumbbell squats.
JC’s take on yoga:
  • Same take as on Olympic weightlifting: great for some, not for others. It depends on its application.
  • All training benefits are predicated on specificity. Lengthening a muscle doesn’t make it appropriate [for all applications.]
  • The flexibility involved in yoga doesn’t transfer to the flexibility needed for pitchers, sprinters or MMA fighters, for example.
  • It’s good for centering and stress-relief. JC might agree to it for calming a fighter preparing for competition.
  • Yoga should honor the individual’s anatomy and range of motion and should be the right style of yoga.
  • Yoga can’t prevent injuries that result from [traumatic] overload that are not the result of inflexibility, but that are often blamed on muscle length and tightness.

 

More about JC

  • JC Santana is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist with distinction (CSCS,* D) and a Fellow (FNSCA) of the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA).
  • He holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Exercise Science from Florida Atlantic University.
  • For eight years, he was the sport-specific conditioning editor for the NSCA Journal. He has served as NSCA’s vice president, chairman of the NSCA Coaches Conference, a member of the NSCA Conference Committee, and NSCA state director for Florida.
  • His IHP certification system has certified 10,000 trainers and-counting worldwide in over 15 countries, including more than 200 Olympic coaches in China and South America.
  • His Institute of Human Performance was voted among the Top Ten Gyms in the US.
  • JC’s authored 17 books and manuals and produced over 70 DVDs. He has published more than 300 articles, many in peer-reviewed journals such as the NSCA’s Strength and Conditioning Journal.

JC’s Institute, Books and Products

 

Special offer for SSP listeners!

Visit JC’s Pro Shop and use promo sspihp for 15% off all downloadable items.

 

Check out JC’s NEW release!

…and also

Functional Training

The Essence of Program Design

The Institute of Human Performance (voted to the Top Ten gym in the nation)

IHPU (Institute of Human Performance University)

 

Visit The IHP Pro Shop for all of JC’s educational materials, equipment, and programs

Download Free HGS Workouts

Special Offer:
Get a FREE week of workouts from my most popular workout program, The Hardgainer Solution


Episode 141. Gettin’ Real with JC Santana

Episode 141. Gettin’ Real with JC Santana

★★★★★
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Show Notes

Scott and JC discuss how an expert coach can adjust and succeed–without selling out–in today’s oft-unfair world of social media marketing.

  • JC begins by sharing some perspective on the magnitude of people’s problems with a comparison of how South Florida and Puerto Rico were affected by a recent hurricane. Somebody always has it better and somebody always have it worse.
  • There are two types of being alone: alone physically, and alone as in “no one loves me.”
  • Life teaches lessons, sometimes early in life, sometimes later.
  • Great coaches aren’t often good business people.
  • Scott shares a personal story of how his material was blatantly plagiarized and exploited.
  • The wannabe expert complicates what’s simple and simplifies what’s complicated.
  • Complaining about the unfairness of social media marketing doesn’t solve the expert coach’s dilemma.
  • Not competing with the online pseudo-expert isn’t an option. They’re in the market. Compete or die.
  • JC has recruited his son to create and run his online marketing, because his son has more expertise in the digital environment.

“You cannot have old packaging.” – JC Santana

  • Is there a devaluation of real expertise? Yes.
    How does the “expert” deal with this: introductory packages followed by guiding those who take advantage of the introductory offer.
  • A product that sold for $199 in the ‘90s sells for $19 today. Because of the number of options available on the internet, the price-per-unit of product has decreased.
  • Just because a product is popular doesn’t mean it works.

“Give them what they’ll “bite,” then educate them backwards.”

  • What is isn’t necessarily what should be.
  • Instinctive training that worked [for the bodybuilding pioneers] isn’t reflected in the research.
  • JC compares engineering feats of today with the pyramids.
  • Training should be adopted for different types of clients. An older client can’t be expected to do the same routine as a professional athlete.

 

More about JC

  • JC Santana is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist with distinction (CSCS,* D) and a Fellow (FNSCA) of the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA).
  • He holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Exercise Science from Florida Atlantic University.
  • For eight years, he was the sport-specific conditioning editor for the NSCA Journal. He has served as NSCA’s vice president, chairman of the NSCA Coaches Conference, a member of the NSCA Conference Committee, and NSCA state director for Florida.
  • His IHP certification system has certified 10,000 trainers and-counting worldwide in over 15 countries, including more than 200 Olympic coaches in China and South America.
  • His Institute of Human Performance was voted among the Top Ten Gyms in the US.
  • JC’s authored 17 books and manuals and produced over 70 DVDs. He has published more than 300 articles, many in peer-reviewed journals such as the NSCA’s Strength and Conditioning Journal.

JC’s Institute, Books and Products

 

Special offer for SSP listeners!

Visit JC’s Pro Shop and use promo sspihp for 15% off all downloadable items.

 

Check out JC’s NEW release!

…and also

Functional Training

The Essence of Program Design

The Institute of Human Performance (voted to the Top Ten gym in the nation)

IHPU (Institute of Human Performance University)

 

Visit The IHP Pro Shop for all of JC’s educational materials, equipment, and programs

Download Free HGS Workouts

Special Offer:
Get a FREE week of workouts from my most popular workout program, The Hardgainer Solution


Episode 140. Gut Health and Fitness with Dr. Angie Sadeghi

Episode 140. Gut Health and Fitness with Dr. Angie Sadeghi

★★★★★
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Show Notes

Gastroenterologist Angie Sadeghi, MD, joins Scott to talk about gut health and fitness-related topics ranging from digestive and metabolic consequences of physique competition, fad diets, body image, to strategies for getting and staying lean.

Angie Sadeghi, MD, is a practicing gastroenterologist who advocates Whole Food Plant Based diet, and exercise, for overall health.

 

“Wellness starts in your gut”

  • Angie used a plant-based diet to recover from her own health and weight problems. She began by not consuming meat and compensated for what she thought was a lack of protein by consuming more dairy. She got worse. Sadeghi then tried keto and other nonsense fad diets, which didn’t work.
  • Keto, Paleo, Atkins…all names for the same thing.
  • Forks Over Knives changed her life forever. After watching it, she began eating a Whole Food Plant Based diet, immediately dropping dairy, oils and sugar from her diet.
  • To add a compelling vision for her weight loss goal, she signed up and competed in a fitness competition.
  • The bodybuilding industry traditionally promotes a type aesthetic that’s seen on stage for “2 seconds”, but is unhealthy in the longer term.
  • You can lose weight, and build muscle using certain types of diets, but it doesn’t mean they’re healthy. Bodybuilders often go for months with little or no fiber.
  • Animal protein, when consumed, doesn’t go to muscle as commonly thought.
  • Depression, heart problems, exhaustion and impacted bowels are all things Dr. Angie has seen in her gastroenterology practice as side effects of bodybuilding diets.

“The human alimentary (digestive) tract is similar to that of an herbivore, not a carnivore.”

  • The right [healthy] way to eat is for the gut microbiome. The gut microbiome live in a symbiotic relationship with us; they eat what we eat.
  • Short chain fatty acids are produced as the result of eating fiber, which has a healing effect on the gut. The microbiome “eat” and ferment it.
  • To have great microbiome diversity, you have to eat fibrous vegetables of different colors.
  • Gluten sensitivity and gluten intolerance: people want evidence that they’re nutritional victims.
  • Most people are not gluten intolerant. There are people who have celiac disease, an autoimmune condition, but it’s more like one out of 100 who have a problem with gluten.
  • Women face a tremendous amount of social pressure related to body image.
  • Self-love—a positive self-image—is often what a physique client truly wants, and not primarily the transformed physique.
  • Women often don’t take care of themselves because they spend all their effort nurturing others.
  • Fitness should be used as part of self-care and keep us grounded.
  • A healthy diet can help treat depression because over 90% of serotonin is made in the gut.
  • Angie recommends bio-identical hormone optimization to post-menopausal women for treatment of related symptoms.
  • Portion control is a thing of the past. It’s almost impossible to get fat if eating a Whole Food Plant Based diet with no refined sugars or oils.
  • The job of a coach is to free people from coaching. A coach empowers the client to do for themselves.

 

More about Dr. Angie

  • Sadeghi is a diplomate of the American Board of Internal Medicine and a diplomate of the American Board of Gastroenterology. She received her training from the University of Southern California (USC), and specializes in treating diseases of digestive tract.
  • She has combined her expertise in the digestive system, and her passion for physical fitness and plant-based nutrition, and developed a comprehensive approach to helping patients recover from illness and live a healthy life.
  • Angie has said she wants to leave a legacy of a doctor who prevented disease in her patients using the mastery of combing integrative medicine, western and eastern medicine, rather than simply using pharmaceuticals.
  • Angie is part of a movement called the Plantrician Project.
  • Sadeghi is featured in three documentaries as a leader in the field of plant-based fitness for health and weight loss.
  • She’s currently working on a book, Trifecta of Rejuvenation and Health and was recently published on the cover of Vegan Health and Fitness Magazine, where she shared a health-related article on making nutrition and fitness fun.

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