Episode 102. Cycle Diet Success Stor(ies): John Paul Bryce (Part II)

Episode 102. Cycle Diet Success Stor(ies): John Paul Bryce (Part II)

★★★★★
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Show Notes

Scott is joined again by super-trainer John Paul Bryce, who talks about the actual diet days of the cycle diet; how he eats on a day-to-day basis along with his meal preferences. JP maintains a lean, ripped physique year-round following a whole food, plant-based diet, and consumes as many as 20,000 calories on his re-feed days.

 

Follow John Paul on his  Website  Facebook  YouTube  Instagram

 

Metalbolism must be fed, not starved

  • Scott begins the show with a rant about “MDD”, Masculinity Deficit Disorder, a term he coined to describe to the overly “macho” attitudes seen in gyms today. There’s no need to project a bad attitude and scowl at people just because they may not be as jacked up as you.
  • John Paul (JP) joins the webinar and begins describing his everyday meals. He eats a whole food, plant-based diet, which happens to have a vegan approach.
  • His meals include ingredients like oatmeal, chia seeds, quinoa, chick peas, black beans, lentils, avocado, spinach, potatoes, peas and corn. He removed animal protein from his diet, but never ate much meat to begin with prior to going vegan.
  • JP has always responded best to a high-carb diet; he tried keto and other fad diets, with no success. He said he felt obligated to try the various diets so he can advise his clients authoritatively. Cycle Diet works best and became his maintenance diet.
  • All JP’s clients eat high-carb diets. He says clients initially have a huge fear factor toward eating carbs.
  • As an ex-competitor on the bodybuilding world, JP observed that most things learned in the fitness world come through fear: fear of getting fat; fear of not making muscle gains; etc. Scott added that there’s a “sheeple” effect, where people follow vogue trends.
  • Scott recounts his own exit from the professional bodybuilding world and his concern over losing his professional identity. “You can’t straddle doorways.”  If you worry about losing something, you can’t open yourself up to new possibilities.
  • Not many personal trainers make a great income. JP’s goal was to educate people and success followed.
  • Scott and JP both note how vital listening to one’s own body is.
  • External measurement has gotten out of control; hence very few know how to read their own biofeedback. “Fitness Freedom” means listening to your body and not to external cues or formulas.
  • No diet strategy works quite like The Cycle Diet, which combines the discipline and sustainability of smaller, whole food meals and the enjoyment that comes with cheat days.
  • The Cycle Diet isn’t an excuse to have cheat days or to justify binge eating.

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Episode 101. Cycle Diet Success Story: John Paul Bryce

Episode 101. Cycle Diet Success Story: John Paul Bryce

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Show Notes

Part 1 of a 2-part series. Scott is joined by Personal Trainer and Cycle Dieter John Paul Bryce, who maintains a ripped, muscular physique year-round, climbs mountains in his native Scotland for recreation, and devours a mountain of food on his cheat days.

 

Find John Paul on his  Website  Facebook  YouTube  Instagram

 

 

Enjoy food instead of fearing it

  • The Cycle Diet is all about when, why and how to use cheat days and cheat meals to optimize metabolism and stay lean year-round. It’s a lifestyle, not a diet per se that is begun and ended. It’s a sustainable, enjoyable way to eat.
  • Every day, we program our metabolisms by the foods we eat.
  • Your body is a smart/optimal machine, so ignoring negative bio-physiological feedback (biofeedback) isn’t a good thing. Example: “keto flu.”
  • John Paul (JP) is 5′-9”, about 170Lbs, lives in the Scottish Highlands where he runs a very successful Personal Training business, and “walks” the Munro-class mountains (3000’+) for recreation.
  • The Cycle Diet works for John Paul and fits well within his lifestyle.
  • He divides his refeed day over two days to accommodate his Saturday’s work schedule. He eats a big cheat meal on Friday nights, then extends his refeed day through Saturday late afternoons. He returns to the healthy whole foods Saturday nights.
  • Here’s what John Paul consumed on a recent cheat day:
    • Two large stuffed crust pizzas followed by a dozen doughnuts and four additional cakes with custard;
    • Eight large pancakes, 3 bananas, blueberries, maple syrup;
    • 500g ribeye steak, fries, macaroni, peas, cornflake ice cream sundae, two Argentinean pancakes with syrup and ice cream, and more mixed ice cream;
    • Small pizza and 200g box of chocolates.
  • On Sundays, he heads straight to the mountain. The Munro climbing also provides a means to clear his mind and put things in perspective.
  • Figuring out one’s own degree of tolerable hunger is important to the Cycle Diet.
  • There are different levels of compensation mode. Some are deep into supercomp mode, like JP and Andy; others like Scott are not quite as deep.
  • As a bodybuilder ex-competitor and prior to starting the Cycle Diet, JP tried all the fad diets: keto, carb cycling, IIFYM, low-carb, high-carb, and so on. All these have metabolic consequences.
  • Success on the Cycle Diet does require discipline. With discipline comes freedom. Being disciplined with an eating strategy allows freedom to splurge wisely.
  • John Paul eats a completely plant-based diet.
  • Research continues to support a whole-food, plant dominant diet as a way to stay healthy and reduce disease.

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Episode 100. Carbs and Insulin

Episode 100. Carbs and Insulin

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Show Notes

Scott celebrates his 100th SSP episode with a lecture on the relationship between insulin and carbs, and the success stories of two clients who’ve lost a combined 170 lbs, eating carbs-based diets and following his workouts.

 

Byron and Mike: real world people with real world results

  • Client Byron chronicles how he has been able to lose 50 lbs. since January. Prior to hiring Scott, Byron (at 5’-11”) weighed 265 lbs. and had health problems, most notably clinically-diagnosed sleep apnea. He also tried the calorie-counting method before he sought Scott’s help.
  • Scott eliminated cardio from Byron’s workout, who gets plenty of “cardio” from his job installing cabinets, and reports now having more energy. His sleep has improved since he began with Scott, and plans to have a second sleep study done to confirm his improvement.
  • Byron continues to shed unwanted fat pounds. He will be back on a future episode as Scott believes Byron can be another JP, who maintains a year-round ripped physique after losing nearly 100 lbs. several years ago.
  • Mike, another of Scott’s clients with a pre-diabetic background, also reports health improvements. Mike shared that after his 120 lb. weight loss, his doctor has taken him off his cholesterol medication, and his A1C has dropped below pre-diabetic levels.

About insulin and carbs:

  • Insulin is an anabolic hormone, more anabolic than testosterone. It is a storage hormone – a storage hormone with “bias.”
  • Insulin is not an “enemy hormone.” The body doesn’t produce enemy hormones.
  • Both diet and exercise have major effects on insulin sensitivity, but low-carb diet advocates promote low-carb diets to fitness enthusiasts as if they were morbidly obese.
  • Research shows that: as the amount of dietary fat decreases, insulin performs better. Scott cites papers published in the Journal of Physiology, The Lancet, The American Journal of Medicine, and Diabetes.
  • Like other leading modern-day ailments such as heart disease and high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes is one of the consequences of poor diet and lifestyle.
  • Type 2 diabetes is almost always preventable, often treatable, and sometimes even reversible through diet and lifestyle changes alone.
  • Greater than 90% of Type 2 diabetics are fat. High fat stores down-regulate insulin receptors, hence, “You aren’t overweight because you have Type 2 diabetes; you have Type 2 diabetes because you’re overweight.”
  • Elevated blood sugar is a symptom from, not a cause of diabetes. Cutting carbs in attempts to reduce blood sugar is faulty logic. Scott’s client Mike lowered his A1C from 6.3 to 5.0 eating a high-carb diet, plus he lost weight.
  • Insulin resistance, not insulin itself, contributes to vascular disease. “The insulin resistance syndrome together with hyperinsulinemia is likely to induce atherosclerotic changes through reduced rather than excessive actions of insulin.” Suzuki, M., et al, Diabetes 45, Suppl. 3, 1996.
  • Research continues to support a whole-food, plant dominant diet as a way to stay healthy and reduce disease.

[References]

Shils, Maurice, (Ed.) et al. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease (pp. 1061-1062). 10th edition, 2006. Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.

Himsworth HP. “Dietetic factors influencing the glucose tolerance and the activity of insulin.” J Physiol (Lond). 1934;81 (1): 29– 48.

Tabák AG1, Herder C, Rathmann W, Brunner EJ, Kivimäki M. “Prediabetes: a high-risk state for diabetes.” Lancet. 2012;379 (9833): 2279– 90.

Pratley RE. “The early treatment of type 2 diabetes.” Am J Med. 2013;126 (9 Suppl 1): S2– 9.

Roden M, Krssak M, Stingl H, et al. “Rapid impairment of skeletal muscle glucose transport/ phosphorylation by free fatty acids in humans.” Diabetes. 1999;48 (2): 358– 64.

McCarty, MF, “Insulin Resistance – Not Hyperinsulinemia – is Pathogenic in Essential Hypertension,” Medical Hypothesis: 1994, 42 – 226-236.

Barnard, RJ, et al. “Role of Diet and Exercise in the Management of Hyperinsulinemia and Associated Atherosclerotic Risk Factors,” American Journal of Cardiology, 1992: 69, 440-444.

Fukagawa, MK, et al. “High Carbohydrate, High-fiber diets increase peripheral insulin sensitivity in healthy young, and old adults,” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 1990: 52: 524-528.

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Episode 99. The Training Model and Program Design

Episode 99. The Training Model and Program Design

★★★★★
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Show Notes

The Coach covers the basics of workout Program Design using principles taken from his book, The Abel Approach: Effort, Training Strategy, Workload Capacity, Recovery Capacity and Internal Hormonal and Biochemical Environment.

 

True expertise is in short supply today. Popularity doesn’t equate to expertise

  • The Training Model is a tool used by professionals to illustrate where the building blocks for individual performance lie.
  • There’s an art and science to Program Design. A collection of exercises does not make a workout; and a collection of workouts doesn’t make an effective program.
  • Assessing the trainee and then designing a program for their needs is both art and science. If you aren’t assessing, you’re guessing.
  • Program Design writing begins with the theme or purpose, then moves on to the structure, then the context, then whether or not (or how) to use planned performance training* or periodization. Then, from that point, he can determine the strategy and tactics, and finally, the elements of the program that will be variable or constant.
  • Effort can be misapplied. An analogy for misapplied effort would be driving north when traveling from Canada to Florida, similar to using cardio as a warm-up for a weight-lifting workout.
  • Training Strategy needs to be related to goals. “Strategy” and “Tactics” are not the same thing.
  • Workload Capacity relates to how much work a trainee can benefit from, with no assessment of a client’s individual needs.
  • Law of Least Eligibility: the less fit person receives the most adoptive stimulus; the most fit person receives the least adoptive stimulus.
  • The SAID principle (Specific Adaptation to Imposed Demands) says that a trainee adapts to their training. So, doing fitness “bootcamp” classes conditions trainees to do bootcamp classes.
  • Recovery Capacity is important, especially for the unconditioned trainee or the older trainee. Scott’s Hardgainer Solution (HGS) strongly considers recovery capacity and builds it into the program.
  • Internal Hormonal and Biochemical Environment determines how a trainee will respond to training. Conditions a client might have, such as diabetes or age, factor into Program Design.
  • The Hardgainer Solution uses the principles of Program Design to target a specific type of trainee: the person who trains hard but who is slow to see gains.
  • A lack of knowledge of exercise physiology or the Training Model makes someone susceptible to falling for vogue exercise trends.

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Episode 98. I’ve Gone Vegan, You Haven’t, and This Is Why That’s Fine

Episode 98. I’ve Gone Vegan, You Haven’t, and This Is Why That’s Fine

★★★★★
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Show Notes

The Coach presents reams of research supporting the health benefits of a plant-based diet and shares his own adoption of a completely plant-based eating strategy.

 

Diet labels/memberships shouldn’t define who people are.

A diet is a lifestyle.

  • Diets with labels are used to create tribalism with strict rules to follow.
  • A diet lifestyle shouldn’t be a religion; nor should it define a person.
  • Scott declares that he’s “Breaking Vegan,” meaning he’s eating a generally vegan diet, such as substituting black beans for chicken in one of his regular meals.
  • His goal is not being lean or getting leaner–time will tell if he indeed does get leaner–but his goal with this recent switch is rather to be as healthy as possible.
  • He’s NOT necessarily suggesting his clients switch to his eating strategy. What works for him is relative to his lifestyle, his goals, his body. He knows his clients have different goals, different lifestyles. The diet should fit the person, not the other way around!
  • Public health organizations’ position papers support vegetarian diets as healthy, as well as vegan, adding that B12 supplementation is needed for vegan diets.
  • Plant-based diets help reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, certain forms of cancer, obesity, and diabetes, among other diseases.
  • Scott’s not ruling out eating eggs, meat or fish on cheat days. For right now, he’s content to stay with plant-based.
  • By coincidence, Scott’s mentee, fitness model Andy Sinclair, has also “gone vegan.”
  • Vegetarian diets are also economical. Andy shared that his grocery bill has gone down; he buys chick peas for $.88 CAD.

[Reference]

Melina, V. “Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Vegetarian Diets.” J Acad Nutr Diet. 2016 Dec;116(12):1970-1980. doi: 10.1016/j.jand.2016.09.025.

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